You are currently browsing the archives for the “Jonathan Maberry” tag.


Hallowen: Magic, Mystery & the Macabre Trick or Treating with Friends

September 8th, 2013

HalloweenMagicMysMacabre-500Halloween comes early this year, with the September release of Halloween: Magic, Mystery, and the Macabre – another terrific anthology from award-winning editor Paula Guran and the good people at Prime Books.

The book is a follow up to Paula’s 2011 anthology Halloween, which featured 33 classic reprints by the likes of Ray Bradbury, H. P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, and F. Paul Wilson. It also featured a thoughtful essay about the origins and traditions of Halloween, which you can read here.

Unlike its predecessor, the new book features all-new Halloween-themed stories. I’ve just finished reading my copy, and it’s a terrific book – perfect material for a cool autumn night.

scent-of-magicAmong the standouts is “The Halloween Men,” a horror story by my good friend Maria V. Snyder, a writer more often associated with romantic fantasy than horror fiction. She and I currently serve as residency writers in the Writing Popular Fiction program at Seton Hill University, and at this summer’s residency she attributed her foray into the macabre to hanging out with Michael A. Arnzen and me. She was being generous, of course. But regardless of how the story came to be, it’s a terrific read. Set in a strange world where the wearing of masks is enforced by mysterious men in black robes, “The Halloween Men” displays the kind of spare yet fully-realized fantasy that has made Maria one of the best fantasy writers working today. If you haven’t discovered her yet, consider checking out her books Scent of Magic, Poison Study, Touch of Power, and all the other titles that you can read about at MariaVSnyder.com. Good reading awaits.

TimeAnother standout story is “All Souls Day” by Barbara Roden, who in recent years has established herself as one of the contemporary masters of short fiction. Publishers Weekly, in a review of her collection Northwest Passages, refers to her work as “deftly executed tales of subtle horror,” and her story in this collection continues that tradition. Barbara is also a multi-award winning editor who, along with her husband Christopher Roden, has been running critically acclaimed Ash-Tree Press since its inception in 1994. I first met Barbara and Christopher at World Fantasy 2007, and we’ve been good friends ever since, getting together at the major conventions at least once or twice a year. In 2010 they edited and published This Way to Egress, the definitive collection of my horror stories.

Jack Pumpkinhead by William Wallace DenslowHalloween: Magic, Mystery, and the Macabre also features terrific new stories by Laird Barron, Laura Bickle, Jay Caselberg, Brenda Cooper, Brian Hodge, Stephen Graham Jones, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Nancy Kilpatrick, Jonathan Maberry, Norman Partridge, John Shirley, Steve Rasnic Tem & Melanie Tem, Carrie Vaughn, A.C. Wise, and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro – some of the modern masters of magic, mystery, and the macabre.

Oh yes, it also contains one of my stories – a new tale of physiological horror titled “Pumpkin Head Escapes.” And since the book releases this week, my friends and I get to do some early trick-or-treating.

Care to join us?

Image Credits:

Halloween: Magic, Mystery, and the Macabre,  Prime Books 2013. Scent of Magic, Harlequin 2013. Northwest Passages, Prime Books 2010. Jack Pumpkin Head, illustration detail by William Wallace Dinslow from L. Frank Baum’s The Road to Oz (1909).

When you look into this book . . .

November 23rd, 2012

 . . . it looks into you.

For their new anthology, the good people at Post-Mortem Press have assembled an impressive lineup of writers who’ve made careers probing the depths of human existence, with editor Eric Beebe challenging each to examine the intersection between science fiction and horror.

In the publisher’s words:

The search for knowledge and understanding, what some folks like to call science, tends to create the biggest sense of unknown. We stare into the abyss, hoping to learn, to understand. But the abyss is a cold and uncaring muse.

We risk all when we enter the abyss, usually with little hope of significant payback. In an everyday sense, the abyss is the absolute bottom of an unending unknown.

Here’s a preview of who you’ll find when you enter this book:

Harlan Ellison. His groundbreaking work on television’s The Outer Limits first introduced me to the wonders of sf-noir, and his legendary anthologies Dangerous Visions and Again Dangerous Visions got me thinking seriously about writing fiction. He’s the winner of multiple Hugo, Nebula, and Edgar awards, and is generally regarded as one of the most influential writers in speculative fiction.

Michael A. Arnzen. He’s won four Bram Stoker Awards in multiple categories, starting with his first novel Grave Markings, which launched the Dell Abyss line back in 1994.

His pioneering work in the digital domain (you can read more about that in the essay “Change Thy Shape”) makes him the perfect writer to explore the horrific effects of technology on our post-modern lives.  

Gary A. Braunbeck. He’s one of the most honored horror writers of his generation, having won the Bram Stoker Awards an astounding six times since 2003. He is also the winner of the International Horror Guild and Black Quill Awards, and the author of some magnificently dark, brooding stories of the human condition.

Tim Waggoner. His story “The Men Upstairs” was a contender for last year’s Shirley Jackson Award, but he’s perhaps best known for his urban fantasy novels Nekropolis,  Dead Streets, and Dark War  – all of which have recently been rereleased in a comprehensive omnibus titled Nekropolis Archives.

In a recent review, Publishers Weekly praised Nekropolis novels for presenting “a complex, intricately crafted setting reminiscent of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter universe.”

Jack Ketchum.  He’s the man Stephen King believes may be “the scariest guy in America.”  The author of over 20 novels and novellas, most recently The Woman and I’m not Sam, he was named one of the genre’s Grand Masters by HWA in 2011.

Also included in this anthology are new stories by Paul Anderson, Rose Blackthorn, C. Bryan Brown, Kenneth W. Cain, Brad Carter, Robert Essig, S.C. Hayden, KT Jayne , Jamie Lackey, Thomas Malafarina, Jessica McHugh, Matt Moore, Andrew Nienaber, Nelson W. Pyles, Jeyn Roberts, and Joseph Williams – some of the most exciting writers working the field today.

According to the cover blurb, the stories come highly recommended by New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Maberry. What more do we need?

Fear the Abyss goes on sale everywhere on November 27, but it’s currently available from Post Mortem Press for a special Black Friday price of $15.00.

Oh yes . . . and I’ve got a story in there too.

My contributor copy hasn’t arrived yet, so if you see the book, please let me know what you think. Also, if you’ve been following my recent posts here at The 21st Century Scop, be sure to check out the new comments at “Twilight Zone Magazine Remembered: Then & Now @ WFC 2012” and “From World Fantasy to Riley’s Pour House. ” And as always, feel free to join the conversation by posting a comment of your own or sending a note vie Facebook or email.

Until next time, I’ll see you in the abyss.

The 2011 Bram Stoker Award™ Winners!

April 1st, 2012

The Horror Writers Association announced the winners of the 2011 Bram Stoker Awards™ at its annual awards banquet last night. This year’s presentation was held in Salt Lake City, Utah, at the World Horror Convention, and marks the 25th Anniversary of the awards.

The award is named for Bram Stoker, best known as the author of Dracula. The trophy, which resembles a miniature haunted house, was designed by author Harlan Ellison and sculptor Steven Kirk.

Twelve new bronze haunted-house statuettes were handed over to the writers responsible for creating superior works of horror last year. This year’s winners are:

Superior Achievement in a NOVEL
Flesh Eaters by Joe McKinney (Pinnacle Books)

Superior Achievement in a FIRST NOVEL
Isis Unbound by Allyson Bird (Dark Regions Press)

Superior Achievement in a YOUNG ADULT NOVEL (tie)
The Screaming Season by Nancy Holder (Razorbill)
Dust and Decay by Jonathan Maberry (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers)

Superior Achievement in a GRAPHIC NOVEL
Neonomicon by Alan Moore (Avatar Press)

Superior Achievement in LONG FICTION
The Ballad of Ballard and Sandrine” by Peter Straub (Conjunctions: 56)

Superior Achievement in SHORT FICTION
“Herman Wouk Is Still Alive” by Stephen King (The Atlantic Magazine, May 2011)

Superior Achievement in a SCREENPLAY
American Horror Story, episode #12: “Afterbirth” by Jessica Sharzer (20th Century Fox Television)

Superior Achievement in a FICTION COLLECTION
The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares by Joyce Carol Oates (Mysterious Press)

Superior Achievement in an ANTHOLOGY
Demons: Encounters with the Devil and his Minions, Fallen Angels and the Possessed edited by John Skipp (Black Dog and Leventhal)

Superior Achievement in NON-FICTION
Stephen King: A Literary Companion by Rocky Wood (McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers)

Superior Achievement in a POETRY COLLECTION
How to Recognize a Demon Has Become Your Friend by Linda Addison (Necon Ebooks)

Also awarded:

Vampire Novel of the Century Award to:
Richard Matheson for his modern classic I Am Legend

Lifetime Achievements:
Rick Hautala and Joe R. Lansdale

The Specialty Press Awards:
Derrick Hussey of Hippocampus Press and Roy Robbins of Bad Moon Books.

The President’s Richard Laymon Service Award:
HWA co-founder Karen Lansdale.

Samhain Publishing served as the Platinum Sponsor for the event.

Source: HWA

The Writer & Social Media

July 26th, 2011

 

Virtual Panel: Robert, J. Sawyer, Jonathan Maberry, Heidi Ruby Miller, Matt Schwartz, S. J. Browne, Jon Sprunk
Virtual Panel: Robert, J. Sawyer, Jonathan Maberry, Heidi Ruby Miller, Matt Schwartz, S. J. Browne, Jon Sprunk

This summer I’ve moderated two panels on social media. The first was at last month’s Bram Stoker Weekend in New York. The second was this month at Confluence in Pittsburgh.

Both panels considered how social media can serve as both a benefit and detriment to the writing life, and the discussions were so rich that I thought it would be fun to put them together into a virtual panel, in which responses from the June panel are placed alongside those from the Confluence discussion. The responses presented here are excerpts from the full-length recordings that I made at both events. They have been edited for clarity and continuity.

In the weeks to come, I’ll try to offer more excerpts, each centering on an element of the ways writers can used social media to build and cultivate a fan base.

The members of our virtual panel are:

Robert J. Sawyer :

One of the sf world’s most honored writers, Sawyer has won more sf and fantasy awards than any other genre novelist. He was also the first sf writer to have a webpage and blog. His most recent novel is www:wonder — the third book in the www: trilogy.

 Jonathan Maberry:

New York Times best-selling and multiple Bram Stoker Award-winning author, Maberry is a magazine feature writer, playwright, content creator and writing teacher/lecturer. His novel Rot & Ruin won the 2010 Cybils Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy.

 Heidi Ruby Miller:

A creative writing instructor at Seton Hill University, Heidi is co-editor (with Michael A. Arnzen) of the writing guide Many Genres, One Craft. She maintains the blog Heidi’s Pick Six, is the author of Ambasadora, and has appeared on Who Wants to be a Millionaire.

Matt Schwartz:

Creator of Shocklines.com and VP of Digital Marketing for Random House Publishing Group, Matt has spent more than 13 years working in the publishing industry with a focus on e-commerce, online merchandising, and online marketing, both viral and traditional. He has also served as editorial director for BarnesandNoble.com and director of online marketing for Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing.

 S. G. Browne:

The author of the novels Breathers and Fated, Browne has been called “one of America’s best satiric novelists” (Kirkus Reviews).  

 Jon Sprunk:

Author of the Shadow Saga novels, Shadow’s Son and Shadow’s Lure, Jon is also the author of a number of short stories published in fantasy anthologies from Fantrasist Enterprises.

 

That’s our virtual panel. Now here’s the first installment:

 

Let’s  start with the basics. Where should the writer begin? If a writer came to you for advice on how to begin building a presence in social media, what advice would you give?

Jon Sprunk:

I think your own website is the place to start. I created my website not long after my first short story was published. My aim was just to give readers a place to go if they were curious about me and my work. It was partly about promoting my work, but when combined with my blog I think it became more about having a dialogue with the world.

Heidi Ruby Miller:

Definitely with the website and blog.

I am to the point where after six years of posting author interviews on Heidi’s Pick Six (which have included interviews with Robert, Jon, and Larry), I find myself getting upwards of 500-600 hits a day. I had to work on this over a four or five year period, but it’s wonderful, and I also feel like what I’m doing with my website is a way of giving back to a lot of the authors, and it may give them a reason to help me out sometime in the future.

Robert J. Sawyer:

I don’t think of a website as social media because it’s not generally interactive. But absolutely I agree that you’ve got to have a website.  People expect you to have one, and you should have one.

If you ever want to get a master’s level course in how not to do websites, just go to the main SFWA page and pick member’s pages at random. Almost all author webpages are appallingly hard to read, not updated, and lacking in current content. So make sure you do a good one. Like everything in life it is better to have no website than a bad website. So, yes, websites for sure – but make sure you do a decent one.

Of social media, I just had lunch with Bud Sparhawk  (which is real social media, two writers facing opposite each another and talking), and I was saying that I have kind of given up doing a lot with my blog. I was one of the first people to have a blog (even way before there was the word blog) but I spend most of my social media efforts these days on Facebook, which I find that I like. I find it more congenial because when you do a blog you’re supposed to allow anonymous comments, and the one thing that Facebook does is it has people there under their real persona.

So for me, a Facebook presence is what I’m enjoying the most these days in social media.

Matt Schwartz:

I’d definitely recommend that most authors establish a presence on Facebook and make sure that elements of everything they’re doing kind of point to that and have a consistent message. Ultimately, you’ll have to establish a Facebook fan page as opposed to just working on your personal profile, which I think is a mistake that some authors have made, going too far down the personal profile route only to be blocked into its restraints and then having to learn how to get their fans over from their personal profile page.

I know that it might seem egotistical for some authors to start out with a fan page or a brand page, but there comes a point where you just have to get over that.

Scott Browne:

I started off with a personal profile and then created a fan page, and I’ve had a lot of authors find me on my profile page because that’s the one where I do a little more interacting. So, of course, I’m friending them. But then when fans want to friend me there, it’s kind of tough to say, “No, you can’t be a friend of mine here.” But there is a point that I’m reaching where I have my fan page and I have my personal page, and I like keeping my private from my public life. That’s part of what I think this panel is about too. How do you keep them separate? So, I’m reaching a point where I may have to say, “If you would like to continue to follow my professional life with my books and my signings and my blog posts, then like my fan page, because I’m not going to be sharing those things here on my personal page anymore.”

Jonathan Maberry:

One of the things that makes migrating people over to your fan page tough is that so many writers have fan pages managed by fans, and that’s a turnoff for a lot of readers. They want the personal page because there’s your personality. I have both, and I keep hitting the limit on my regular page as to how many people I can have, which is 5,000. So almost every day I’ll spend a few minutes posting happy birthdays to people who are actively interacting on my personal page but aren’t yet on my fan page. And I will send everyone who isn’t already on my fan page an invitation to migrate over. I’ll do that once, and if they don’t migrate over I’ll cut them anyway. But if they do migrate over I cut them from the regular page too. The idea is I eventually want to get everyone over to the fan page. If I could go back and start again, I would start with the fan page only, but I didn’t even know about the fan page when I started Facebook. 

I am also very careful with what I put up about my personal life. The version of myself that I put on my Facebook page is kind of the Goodtime Charley version of me. I don’t go too deep into my family. I don’t have a lot about my wife or my son. So it’s kind of the cocktail bar next to my fan page, and they kind of work together. One will be a little more business oriented, the other will be a little more fun (but also business oriented). They work pretty well together.

But to get back to the original question about where you should start. Facebook is essential, but I think Linkedin is incredibly important, even if you’re not yet published, because a lot of jobs can come to you as a writer through linked in. I’ve gotten all sorts of work from Linkedin.

And Twitter is useful. A lot of folks have a resistance to Twitter, but it is brand reinforcement. Anything that a writer does online that connects to their name is brand reinforcement. As long as the message going out is a positive one, then it’s positive brand reinforcement.

So, when I teach workshops on social media, it’s Linkedin, Facebook, and Twitter as the first wave (even before you have a book deal) then blog, and then, once you have a deal, a website. So it kind of has a tier effect. But Facebook is probably the easiest to grasp, and the others are good for fitting in that part of your audience that doesn’t overlap with Facebook. There are people who are on my Linkedin page that aren’t on Facebook. And there are people that I have on twitter who aren’t on either. But you can rig it so that with your fan page you can place one post there and it goes to Linkedin and Twitter, so you have that little cascade effect that hits everyone.

 

That’s our first installment.

Any thoughts, questions, or comments? Please post them below. As with all panels (virtual or real) audience feedback is vital to the discussion.

In the days to come, the virtual panel will be discussing mistakes writers should avoid when establishing a social-media presence. Keep checking back. Lots more to come!