Author: Lawrence C. Connolly

  • Great but Forgotten Films

    Great but Forgotten Films

    One of the “great” science fiction films I recall seeing as a kid is World Without End, a post-apocalyptic adventure in which a band of astronauts lands on a primitive planet that turns out to be Earth in the future. That’s not a spoiler. Other films might present similar surprises as twist endings, but World…

  • Science Fiction Summer

    Science Fiction Summer

    Summer days. Books. Spaceships and dinosaurs. That pretty much captures my misspent youth—so much so that even now I associate lazy July afternoons with Winston juveniles, Ace paperbacks, and EC Comics. Given that association, it’s fitting that summer is the season of the Nebula Conference (which I posted about here) and the two major science…

  • Canyon of Dreams

    Canyon of Dreams

    If you dig it, they will come. In the early 1900s, the Union Rock Company excavated a tunnel through the base of a mountain in what was then called Brush Canyon. Their intent was to extract rock to pave the streets of LA. What they left behind was something more enduring. Over the years, the…

  • Putting Together A Short Fiction Collection

    Putting Together A Short Fiction Collection

    You’ve been writing stories. Some have appeared in magazines and anthologies. A few are still making the rounds. And a few more—possibly the best of the lot—don’t seem to be a good fit for the current markets. But one thing’s for sure. You’ve got enough for a collection. So what do you do? Next week,…

  • Writing & Resilience

    Writing & Resilience

    Later this morning, I’m leaving for Milford, the town where Damon Knight, James Blish, and Virginia Kidd helped establish science fiction as a respected literary genre and where The Virginia Kidd Literary Agency still operates out of Kidd’s former residence. Blish and Kidd dubbed their residence Arrowhead, and during the 1960s it served as a…

  • Writing in Private

    Writing in Private

    “Writing, at its best, is a lonely life.” So said Ernest Hemingway when accepting the Nobel Prize in 1954. And yet, a few decades earlier (according to his recollections in A Moveable Feast) he wrote many of his short stories in public—surrounded by (and occasionally taking inspiration from) the strangers who came and went as…