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This Week on Mystery Theatre:
Going Up in “The Play’s the Thing”

March 26th, 2021

It’s opening night. You make your entrance, hit your mark, and then – silence. Your mind goes blank. You can’t remember your first line.

It’s called “going up” on stage – a reference to the reflexive way people have of looking up and to the side when they can’t remember something. According to actor John Mahoney, “It happens to everybody. I’ve read stories about John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Noel Coward and Olivier.”

Knowing that such luminaries have had it happen to them may make it easier for the rest of us. And it’s good to keep in mind that… [read more at the 21st-Century Scop].

This Week on Mystery Theatre:
Going Up in “The Play’s the Thing”

March 26th, 2021

It’s opening night. You make your entrance, hit your mark, and then – silence. Your mind goes blank. You can’t remember your first line.

It’s called “going up” on stage – a reference to the reflexive way people have of looking up and to the side when they can’t remember something. According to actor John Mahoney, “It happens to everybody. I’ve read stories about John Gielgud, Ralph Richardson, Noel Coward and Olivier.”

Knowing that such luminaries have had it happen to them may make it easier for the rest of us. And it’s good to keep in mind that, again according to Mahoney, “In virtually every performance, somebody forgets something.”

Not surprisingly, actors have plenty of stories, and you can hear some of them in a special extended interview conducted with Prime Stage actors Liam Macik and Sean Patrick Sears that is being made available as a special bonus to anyone who makes a donation to Prime Stage before April 1.

You can also hear excerpts of that interview with Macik and Sears on Episodes 4 and 5 of “The Play’s the Thing,” where you’ll also hear the conclusion to this season’s story of a stage detective who “goes up” on stage after solving a real-life mystery.

You can listen to Act 5 of “The Play’s the Thing” by clicking the player below, or – if you missed any of the previous episodes – by accessing the entire season on Apple,  Audible,  Deezer,  Libsyn,  Spotify, or the podcasts page at PrimeStage.com.

I’ll met you there!

Who’s listening?
Advantages and Pitfalls of Wireless Audio

March 19th, 2021

“I do community theater, and all muting and unmuting is done from the tech booth. Well, every once in a while, if the tech person can’t mute an actor’s mic right away when they leave the stage, the audience catches them saying something like, ‘Well, I really f****d THAT up!'”

The above account, courtesy of Buzzfeed’s “17 Seriously Cringeworthy ‘Forgot To Turn The Mic Off’ Stories,” is one of many that deals with the ways wireless audio has … [read more at the 21st Century Scop].

Who’s listening?
Advantages and Pitfalls of Wireless Audio

March 19th, 2021

“I do community theater, and all muting and unmuting is done from the tech booth. Well, every once in a while, if the tech person can’t mute an actor’s mic right away when they leave the stage, the audience catches them saying something like, ‘Well, I really f****d THAT up!'”

The above account, courtesy of Buzzfeed’s “17 Seriously Cringeworthy ‘Forgot To Turn The Mic Off’ Stories,” is one of many that deals with the ways wireless audio has complicated life in the 21st century.

Likewise, the Cosmopolitan article “11 Zoom Confessions That’ll Have You Double-Checking Your Mute Button” features stories about sounds not-intended-for sharing. In one, a contributor relates what happened when she took her laptop to the bathroom only to discover afterward that the “video was off, but audio was on.” Then, to make things worse, she adds: “The meeting was recorded.”

Equally embarrassing, a piece in Elle titled “The Most Embarrassing Zoom Fails People Have Suffered In Quarantine,” relates one of the downfalls of Zoom’s active-speaker mode (which expands your video to full screen whenever you speak). The article includes the confession of a zoomer who writes: “I accidentally burped, and the main screen went to me.”

Yikes!

As an antidote for such cringe-worthy stories, the latest installment of Prime Stage Mystery Theatre’s “The Play’s the Thing” explores how unintended transmission could actually be a good thing. You can check it out by clicking the player below or by finding Prime Stage Mystery Theatre on Apple,  Audible,  Deezer,  Libsyn,  Spotify, or the podcasts page at PrimeStage.com.

Give it a listen. If you like what you hear, be sure to spread the word … just be sure to mute that mic when you’re done.