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Countdown to Mystery:
Murder on the Orient Express

September 27th, 2020

We’re counting down to Prime Stage Theatre’s release of A Knavish Piece of Mystery, the first installment in a roster of virtual programming running this fall on Prime Online. The series has been generating good press in the past few days, with preview stories appearing on Local Pittsburgh and Trib Live. And I understand there are more to come in the next few days. Stay tuned!

Our two previous posts highlighted Anthony Shaffer’s Sleuth and Ira Levin’s Deathtrap. Both feature writers who find themselves caught in real-life mysteries, a device that you will also find featured in the forthcoming Knavish Piece.

Today, we’ll consider Murder on the Orient Express, the Agatha Christie who-done-in that began life as a novel (1934) and went on to become a well-regarded film (1974) directed by Sidney Lumet.

The plot centers on Christie’s Hercule Poirot, a master detective in the mold of St. John Lord Merridew (Sleuth) and Augustus LaFleur (A Knavish Piece), who investigates a murder on a snowbound train. The ensemble cast is at the top of their game, and the film has the kind of style and elegance you’d expect from one of cinema’s greatest directors.

While selecting plays and films to highlight in this series of posts, I was initially tempted to recommend Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap, which has the distinction of being the longest-running play in theatre history (opening in London in 1952!), but, as a film version is not readily available and live performances are on hiatus, I have decided to go with the more accessible Express.

(Theatrical aside: Both The Mousetrap and A Knavish Piece take their titles from the same source. Can you name it?)

Sidney Lumet’s Murder on the Orient Express is readily available on most major streaming platforms, including Prime and Vudu. And, for those of you who prefer physical media, it’s also available on Blu-Ray, DVD, and VHS.

There’s also a remake (2017) directed by Kenneth Branagh and produced by Ridley Scott. Though not as well regarded as Lumet’s film, the newer version is likewise available on Prime, Vudu, and the usual assortment of physical media (including 4K!).

That’s it for now. Check out the trailer below, and I’ll meet you back here tomorrow for another recommendation.

Four days and counting!