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Prime Stage Mystery Theatre:
Now on Audible

November 12th, 2020

The complete first season of Prime Stage Mystery Theatre is now available on Audible.

Each episode of Season 1 features a segment of A Knavish Piece of Mystery — a locked-door who-done-it that explores the intersection between life and storytelling. In addition, you’ll also hear comments and interviews in which listeners responding to elements of mystery.

Check it out, and if you like what you hear, consider becoming a Prime Stage Patron by visiting their support page. You’ll be doing your part to keep the footlights warm during these dark days of live theatre.

Also, be sure to take a look at the list of Prime Online‘s upcoming virtual stage performances including Einstein, A Stage Portrait, One Christmas Carol, and Sojourner Truthall of which should help fill the gap while we’re prepping the next five-part installment of Mystery Theatre, which should launch in the first quarter of 2021.

Can’t wait!

More details coming soon!

The Final Reveal:
Act V of A Knavish Piece of Mystery

October 29th, 2020

You’ve explored the mystery, assembled the clues, dismissed the red hearings. Now it’s time for the final reveal. If you’ve been with us through the previous episodes of Prime Stage Mystery Theatre, you’re ready to move on to the final scene. You’ll find the link to that episode here. Otherwise, you’ll want to access the library of previous installments. After all, a good mystery should be about the entire journey.

One of the fun aspects of working on this series has been including stories from listeners in the introductory segments. Check out the haunted-potty story featured in the opening to Act 4 and the locked-door solution recounted in the intro to today’s episode. The latter is especially interesting in how it validates one of the twists presented in Acts 3 and 4. That trick really works!

I’m currently in touch with Prime Stage about a possible second season of Mystery Theatre, which could launch as soon as late February or early March. If that happens, we hope to continue featuring comments and stories from listeners as a way to underscore how the story’s second-person narratives are designed to put you in the story.

In the meantime, we hope you’ll help spread the word about Mystery Theatre by inviting your friends to join the investigations. In addition, please consider becoming a supporter of Prime Stage Theatre. Your contributions are vital in helping bring theatre to your home during these days of physical distancing.

And speaking of theatre in the home, be sure to get your tickets for the Prime Online production if Einstein, A Stage Portrait, directed by Wayne Brinda and staring Matt Henderson as the physicist who changed the way we look at the universe.

Einstein streams live on November 13 at 8:00 PM ET, with a recorded link available for purchase thereafter. Ticket sales begin today. You won’t want to miss this one.

For now, get out those spyglasses one more time and join us for the conclusion of A Knavish Piece of Mystery. Click the player. It’ll take you there.

Greg Hall on Mystery Theatre

October 23rd, 2020

I once said that if Greg Hall didn’t exist, the horror genre would have to invent him. That’s still true. He’s one of a kind. An improve comic who became an internet radio pioneer who went on to write stories and books leavened with equal dashes of horror and outrageous humor. He’s a versatile guy, but he’s perhaps best known for his alter ego The Funky Werepig, a podcast host who is to Greg Hall what Tony Clifton was to Andy Kaufman.

Over the years, The Funky Werepig podcast has interviewed some of the biggest names in horror.

Among the Werepig’s guests have been Joe R. Lansdale, Lisa Morton, F. Paul Wilson, Lucy Snyder, Thomas F. Monteleone, and many more. If you have a favorite genre writer, chances are they’ve done the Werepig.

Greg’s podcast has moved around a bit over the years, starting with a good run on BlogTalk Radio before moving to TMV Cafe and then to the now-defunct ParaMania Radio. It’s currently available on YouTube.

This week, you can also catch Greg appearing as a special guest on Prime Stage Mystery Theatre, where he helps introduce Episode 4 by recounting his story about living in a house with haunted plumbing. He shared the tale on my Facebook page in response to one of Prime Stage’s posts about the ghostly sounds depicted in A Knavish Piece of Mystery, and he dropped by the show to share the tale.

You can hear that story as well as the latest installment of A Knavish Piece by clicking the link below. Or, if you’re new to the series, by accessing the full episode directory here.

Either way, we’ll meet you there!

What’s Inside the Locked Room?
A Knavish Piece of Mystery – Act 3

October 15th, 2020

You might think that the best way to solve a locked-door mystery would be to open the room and see what’s inside. But what happens when what’s inside provides more questions than answers?

We’ll explore those possibilities today as Prime Stage Mystery Theatre’s podcast A Knavish Piece of Mystery enters its third week with a new episode that considers how the solutions we seek may not be solutions at all.

Also, we’ll take time at the beginning of the show to discuss suggestions for opening locked doors. Some practical, some extreme, and one or two that are maybe a little crazy — all in an effort to anticipate what our master sleuth August LaFleur might do as he attempts to solve the mystery of the sealed room.

You can listen in by clicking here or by using the embedded player at the bottom of this post.

If you’ve missed any of our previous episodes or if you’d like to get a refresher on what’s happened in the story so far, you can access the complete episode directory at the Prime Online podcast page. You’ll find that episode list here.

So get out your axes, hinge-pin pullers, and strips of door-hacking plastic as Mystery Theatre presents Act 3 of our locked-door who-done-it — a mystery in which we discover that the solutions we seek may not be solutions at all, and that the story’s knavish piece of mystery may be more puzzling than even a master sleuth can imagine.

Hit play. I’ll meet you there!