You are currently browsing the archives for the “Voices: Tales of Horror” tag.


It’s Official:
Voices now in eBook from Fantasist Ent.

June 26th, 2018

I’m back home, settling in after KGB and SHU. I wrote my posts on those events more quickly than usual, but they seem to be lucid (to me at least).

Both book-related appearances offered an opportunity to get the word out about Fantasist Enterprises’ new edition of Voices: Tales of Horror, and I’m pleased to report that the digital edition is now available as an eBook bundle (Mobi, ePub, and PDF) direct from the Fantasist website, and as a Kindle edition from Amazon.

The same edition will be available in print later this summer.

Including the complete text of the book’s first printing, the upgraded Voices also features a new foreword by Mick Garris (producer of our forthcoming Nightmare Cinema), a bonus story (complete with new art by World Fantasy Award nominee Jason Zerrillo), and some very cool Easter eggs – all for the price of a pumpkin spice latte (and it’ll last a lot longer).

The eBook bundle, available direct from Fantasist, gives the biggest bang for your buck, and while you’re visiting the site, you might want to check out FE’s other titles, all of which are illustrated and packaged with an eye for graphic design that makes their books unique among genre publishing.

Looking for a recommendation? Check out the urban fantasy anthology Modern Magic, edited by W. H. Horner and featuring stories by Christe M. Callabro, Donna Munro, and Rhonda Mason — all of whom were in attendance at In Your Write Mind. In addition to mind-bending fiction, the book features terrific illustrations by David Seidman — one of my favorite fantasy illustrators. And if that wasn’t enough, the last I checked, FE was offering the book at a 50% discount. A steal!

This post has been my third in as many days. (Whew!) I have no intention of keeping that pace, but I do intend to be back very soon with some previews of the big Nightmare Cinema premiere at next month’s Fantasia Film Festival.

Can’t wait!

Images

The 21st-Century Scop and W. H. Horner at In Your Write Mind. Photo by Christe M. Calabro.

The second-edition of Voices: Tales of Horror. Cover art by Jason Zerrillo. Cover design by W. H. Horner of Fantasist Enterprises.

Modern Magic. Cover art by David Seidman. Cover design by W. H. Horner of Fantasist Enterprises.

Genre is a State of Mind:
Books and Authors @ In Your Write Mind

June 25th, 2018

The genre stars came out on Saturday night for the latest installment of the In Your Write Mind book event – a massive gathering of science fiction, horror, fantasy, mystery, romance, and YA writers that’s held each June at Seton Hill University.

This was my first time back at IYWM in four years. June is always such a busy month. But this year provided a chance to swing through Greensburg on my return from Fantastic Fiction at KGB … and I’m glad I did.

Held in Seton Hill’s new Performing Arts Center, the event featured over 35 genre writers and hundreds of titles. It also gave students in SHU’s graduate writing program the opportunity to mingle with alums, residency writers, publishers, and other genre professionals.

Among the publishers were John Edward Lawson and Jennifer Barnes (left) of Raw Dog Screaming Press and Dog Star Books. Now in their fifteenth year of publishing, Jennifer and John have been taking part in IYWM events since their inception. As in past years, they were joined at the event by many of their writers, including Michael A. Arnzen – the four-time Stoker Award winner who was instrumental in starting the Writing Popular Fiction program at SHU.

Also present with a long list of titles was William H. Horner (right) of Fantasist Enterprises. Now in their sixteenth year, FE is known for books that combine the work of genre writers and graphic artists to create anthologies, collections, and novels with a focus on strong writing and dynamic design. After taking a hiatus on new titles in 2014 (which allowed Will time to focus on teaching and conducting workshops), FE has returned with a new edition of my collection Voices: Tales of Horror (one of five titles that I worked on with them) and plans for some exciting web-based content in the months ahead.

Among the writers present at the event were Albert Wendland, who was signing advance copies of his forthcoming science fiction novel In a Suspect Universe; and Scott A. Johnson, who arrived with his fresh-off-the-presses horror novel Shy Grove: A Ghost Story.

Indicative of the diversity of authors and books featured at IYWM were Priscilla Oliveras (romance) and Genevieve Iseult Eldredge (fantasy) with their contrasting red and black displays.

Priscilla and Genevieve are among the many graduates of SHU’s Writing Popular Fiction program who returned to Greensburg to take part in IYWM.

In all, this year’s book event was the perfect place for genre writers and readers to gather on a summer evening.

Special thanks go out to Deanna Sjolander, who successfully wrangled the participating authors and publishers and made it all look easy. That’s Deanna in the photo to the right, purchasing a book from Dog Star author J. L. Gribble. Deanna is currently working on programming for the upcoming World Fantasy Convention in Baltimore, and her involvement has me thinking seriously about registering for the con before it fills up.

There’s more, of course. I’ve barely scratched the surface. If you attended IYWM and feel like adding to this recap, please feel free to post a comment. It’s always good hearing from people who visit this site, and getting feedback on particular stories helps gauge the kind of posts that best connect with readers.

I hope to be posting again soon with some previews of the rapidly approaching Fantasia Film Festival and the premiere of Nightmare Cinema. Until next time … scop on!

Images

  • In Your Write Mind banner from the organization’s Facebook Page.
  • John Edward Lawson and Jennifer Barnes of Raw Dog Screaming Press and Dog Star Books.
  • William H. Horner of Fantasist Enterprises.
  • Priscilla Oliveras (romance) and Genevieve Iseult Eldredge (fantasy) with their displays.
  • Writer wrangler and author Deanna Sjolander with J. L. Gribble.
  • Michael A. Arnzen and the 21st-Century Scop hanging out at the Fantasist display.
  • All photos (with the exception of the IYWM banner) copyright © 2018 bt The 21st-Century Scop. 

Gone Scopping:
Keeping the Oral Tradition Alive @ KGB

June 24th, 2018

If you’re like me, you spend a lot of time reading screens. When it comes to accessibility, the digital format is hard to beat. But is it the best format for sharing stories?

I recall an article at CNN.com in which a writer lamented the loss of print: “I miss the edges – physical and psychological. I miss the start of reading a print magazine, but mostly, I miss the finish. I miss the satisfaction of putting the bundle down, knowing I have gotten through it all.”

For those of us who came of age with print media, it’s hard not to sympathize. Yet, it’s worth remembering that the art of story existed long before ink and paper. Which brings us to one of the recurring themes of this blog site — story as performance.

Live storytelling may not be as convenient as digital or print media. You need to go to it, enter a physical space, remain there for the duration. And it isn’t as durable as print. It’s ephemeral, existing only for the moment. But it remains my preferred platform for sharing stories.

And that brings us to Fantastic Fiction at KGB.

This past Wednesday, I again got the chance to experience live storytelling on both sides of the KGB stage. And once again, I came away convinced that spoken-word storytelling still has an important place in the digital age.

This time out, I had the chance to read with multiple Hugo Award winner Mary Robinette Kowal. Although best known as a fantasy writer, Mary proved she is equally adept at science fiction by reading the opening chapter of The Calculating Stars, the soon-to-be-released first book of her Lady Astronaut duology. The excerpt features a gripping account of a catastrophic meteorite strike as experienced by a narrator far removed from the point of impact – a narrative device that amps up the tension as the character comes to realize what has happened. A seasoned reader (Wednesday’s performance was her fifth at KGB), Mary effectively brought the story to life in a manner that transcended the printed page. A stellar performance.

For my presentation, I had originally planned on sharing the bonus story from the newly released second-edition of Voices: Tales of Horror. The story first appeared as “Human Caverns” in Fear the Abyss (Post-Mortem Press, 2013). Revised and retitled as “Siren” for the new edition of Voices, the story is one of my personal favorites. But as the performance date approached, I began toying with the notion of framing the performance as a vintage anthology show (ala The Outer Limits) complete with a control-voice intro and several stand-alone stories (ala Night Gallery).

I felt the format might make for a fun presentation, and I like the way it provided a kind of homage to the upcoming anthology film Nightmare Cinema.

The resulting presentation featured the control-voice story “Aberrations” and the flash-fiction tales “Step on a Crack” and “Prime Time!” (all three taken from Visions: Short Fantasy & SF. I then concluded with an excerpt from “Siren” (the story I had originally planned to present in its entirety) and a control-voice outro.

How did it go? Did I make the right call? You’ll soon be able to judge for yourself. Fantastic Fiction will be posting the audio of the performance (expertly recorded and mastered by Gordon Linzer) at their website. Naturally, the digital recording will be one-step removed from the physical experience, but it should nevertheless give a sense of the oral tradition that hosts Ellen Datlow and Matthew Kressel are keeping alive at Fantastic Fiction at KGB.

For now, thanks for reading these digital words. Until we meet again (whether in person, print, or pixels) … scop on!

Images:

  • Fantastic Fiction at KGB graphic from Kickstarter page, created by Matthew Kressel.
  • Crowd outside KGB Bar from The end of the Tour, A24 Films, 2014.
  • Mary Robinette Kowal and Lady Astronaut books at KGB, photo by Ellen Datlow.
  • The 21st-Century Scop reads from memory at KGB, photo by Tom Connair.
  • Cover of the second-edition of Voices: Tales of Horror. Cover art by Jason Zerrillo. Cover design by W. H. Horner of Fantasist Enterprises.

The 21st Century Scop @ SHU

April 12th, 2013
Flashing the Veins sign: students in Michael A. Arnzen’s Horror Writing class welcome the 21st Century Scop to Seton Hill University.

Flashing the Veins sign: students in Michael A. Arnzen’s Horror Writing class welcome the 21st-Century Scop to Seton Hill University. What a blast!

This week the 21st-Century Scop visited Seton Hill University, where four-time Bram Stoker Award winning author Michael A. Arnzen teaches an undergraduate class in horror writing. The students are currently working on horror-related media projects, and Michael invited me to drop by to talk about plugging-in the ancient art of storytelling.

It was a great time.

After a brief  summary of Scop 101, I presented live readings of “Step on a Crack” and “Echoes.”

For “Echoes,” I incorporated projected stills from the Rodney Altman film adaptation of the story. And of course, since it was a 21st-Century Scop presentation, both readings incorporated musical cues.

The students and I also talked about Veins: The Soundtrack and the Voices book trailer, which features the art of World-Fantasy Award nominee Jason Zerrillo (one of my favorite fantasy artists).

But the highlight for me was fielding some terrific questions about writing and media . . . and even getting a chance to pose a few questions of my own.

It was a great time.

The next Scop Stop will be in Morgantown, West Virginia, where I’ll be presenting at the Monongalia Arts Center, 107 High Street, on April 18. The stories begin at 7:00 PM. Hope to see you there!